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March 2017

Climate Change, Morphing into an Existential Threat – Professor Veerabhadran Ramanathan

March 9 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Hamied Auditorium, Christ’s College, Hamied Auditorium, Christ's College, 46 King Street
Cambridge, CB1 1AH United Kingdom
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Professor Veerabhadran Ramanathan, Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric and Climate Sciences at the University of California, San Diego, will discuss the existential risks of climate change. This lecture is organised by the Centre for Science and Policy in partnership with Professor Charles Kennel, Christ's College and the Centre for the Study of Existential Risk. This event is free to attend but numbers are limited, please register for this event here. There are two climate seminar series running this term as part of In it…

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Reporting from Extreme Environments – Lyse Doucet

March 10 @ 5:30 pm - 6:30 pm
Lady Mitchell Hall, Sidgewick Site
Cambridge, United Kingdom
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Lyse Doucet will give a talk on “Reporting from Extreme Environments” the eight of the popular Darwin Lecture Series, which this year is co-convened by CSER Research Associate Julius Weitzdoerfer. The talk will be able to be viewed on the Darwin College Lectures website. The ‘Extremes’ lecture series take place every Friday during Lent term (January to March). The lectures are given at 5.30 p.m. in The Lady Mitchell Hall, Sidgwick Avenue, with an adjacent overflow theatre with live TV coverage. Each lecture is typically attended…

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April 2017

Responsibility and Inequality in a Risky World w/ Prof Heather Douglas

April 29 @ 5:30 pm - 7:00 pm
Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College
Cambridge, CB2 1TQ United Kingdom
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We live in a world full of emerging risk.  We generate new capacities with the potential to reorder our world and we discover new risks from old practices. What responsibilities come with doing this work? How should we manage the attendant risks?  I will describe the nature and boundaries of responsibility for the new in a risky world, and I will argue  that the responsibility to think through the risks that come with our knowledge production can never be fully…

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May 2017

Deep Learning: Artificial Intelligence Meets Human Intelligence w/Prof Terrence Sejnowski

May 2 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
TBC,

Deep learning is based on technical advances made by the neural network revolution in the 1980's.  Why did it take so long for neural networks to recognise speech and objects in images at human levels? What were the breakthroughs that made deep learning possible? Which industries will deep learning disrupt and how will deep learning change your life? These are some of the issues that this public lecture will explore. About the speaker Dr Terrence Sejnowski received his PhD in physics from Princeton University. He was a…

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Collective awareness: A vision of a new economics and how it could reduce risk w/Prof Doyne Farmer

May 8 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
The Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College
Cambridge, CB2 1TQ United Kingdom
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Science gives us a collective awareness that turns unknown unknowns into probabilities and helps us deal with risks and avoid catastrophic scenarios.  It is worth distinguishing three levels of collective awareness, that involve understanding the external environment, our effect on the environment, and our collective effect on ourselves.  This lecture will focus on the hardest of these — our collective effect on ourselves — and on economics in particular.   The economy underpins almost everything we do, and economic fluctuations cost the…

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Overpopulation: A driver of climate change? w/ Prof Hilary Greaves

May 10 @ 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
Winstanley Lecture Theatre, Trinity College
Cambridge, CB2 1TQ United Kingdom
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It is often remarked that the significant drivers of climate change include not only high and rising levels of fossil fuel use per person, but also high and rising human population size. The logic behind this remark appears at first sight to be simple: climate change is driven by emissions, and total emissions are equal to per-capita emissions multiplied by population, so of course (one might think) higher population will lead to more climate change. I will argue that given…

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